EPA enforcement
Read Online
Share

EPA enforcement a progress report, December 1974 to December 1975 : air, noise, pesticides, water. by United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Enforcement and General Counsel.

  • 433 Want to read
  • ·
  • 50 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Enforcement and General Counsel, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in Washington, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Environmental law -- United States.,
  • Environmental law -- United States -- Cases.

Book details:

The Physical Object
Paginationii, 223 p. :
Number of Pages223
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15211706M

Download EPA enforcement

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The Summary of Criminal Prosecutions resulting from environmental investigations provides information to the public and regulated community on concluded criminal enforcement cases, by the U.S. Government's Fiscal Year (October to September). The Summary will be updated regularly.   Learn about EPA enforcement actions that reduce air pollution from sources ranging from power plants to vehicle engines. Read about how we safeguard communities by reducing waste and chemical risks, and by cleaning up contaminated sites. Bong Seob Bag and Dwintoro were each charged with one count of violating MARPOL {33 U.S.C. (a) - knowingly violates}. Keoje Marine was charged with three counts total, including knowingly failing to maintain an accurate oil record book in violation of 33 U.S.C. (a); obstruction of justice related to the creation of ficititious oil record book entries in violation of 18 U.S.C. ; and. Based on personal interviews with present and former enforcement officials at EPA, the U.S. Department of Justice, and key congressional staff members—along with extensive research among EPA documents and secondary sources—the book vividly recounts the often tumultuous history of EPA’s enforcement by: 5.

  EPA’s Guide to Enforcement and Compliance at Federal Facilities explains the federal government’s responsibilities under the environmental statutes, and the enforcement and compliance process used by EPA at federal facilities (Formerly known as The Yellow Book: Guide to Environment and Compliance at Federal Facilities”. The Yellowbook: Guide to Environmental Enforcement and Compliance at Federal Facilities US EPA OECA/FFEO Changes to the Yellow Book One page of Executive Order was mistakenly omitted from Appendix C. The book is at once a chronicle of EPA's enforcement history from the Agency's beginnings through the George W. Bush (Bush II) administration and an analysis of some important questions regarding EPA's institutional performance and environment that are suggested by more generalized writings on regulatory enforcement, congressional oversight. Enforcement of the hazardous substances component of the HSNO Act is carried out by a large number of central and local government agencies. The EPA has developed a decision process to provide enforcement agencies with certainty about when they should be the lead agency, and/or when they need to be involved, following a non-compliance or an.

Octo Senate Session. The Senate passed H.R. , to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act. The Senate agreed to , to appoint a. ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately , EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge.   The only published work that treats the historical evolution of EPA enforcement, this book provides a candid inside glimpse of a crucial aspect of the work of an important federal agency. Based on personal interviews with present and former enforcement officials at EPA, the U.S. Department of Pages: Regulatory Enforcement at the EPA. activities of the Environmental Protection Agency.” proof in DeLong’s crisp little book. EPA staffers should be sentenced to keep reading it until.